Euromicro DSD/SEAA 2019

August 28 – 30, 2019
Kallithea, Chalkidiki | Greece

Keynotes DSD & SEAA

Alexander Chatzigeorgiou
Cross-disciplinary Approaches in Technical Debt Management

Dr. Alexander Chatzigeorgiou

Abstract

Software professionals nod in agreement whenever the Technical Debt metaphor is brought up. It seems that people naturally take shortcuts, or ‘quick-and-dirty’ solutions to overcome a technical problem and deliver faster to the client; however, compromised quality has a strong impact on long-term maintenance which has been empirically grounded and can put long-lived software projects into danger. Savings achieved by taking these shortcuts represent the principal of technical debt whereas the increased future maintenance costs represent the corresponding interest that has to be paid. The research community has recently focused on all aspects of Technical Debt Management: identification, measurement, prioritization, repayment, prevention, monitoring, representation and communication.

Technical Debt is by its nature associated with software; however, the emergence of technical debt is a complex phenomenon and its root causes can be traced to people, processes and employed tools. Thus, the arsenal of methods to study this multifaceted concept of software maintenance should exploit experience and ideas from other disciplines. In this talk we will focus on cross-disciplinary approaches that have been proposed to tackle challenges in managing technical debt. Inspiration has been drawn from a diverse set of scientific fields, ranging from Operations Research, Metaheuristic search techniques and Archetypal Analysis to identify ‘ideal’ software modules, to behavioral economics and psychology for studying intertemporal decision making by software professionals. For each approach, the ‘loan’ from the corresponding discipline into Technical Debt research will be demonstrated and representative empirical results will be discussed.


Alexander Chatzigeorgiou

Alexander Chatzigeorgiou is a Professor of Software Engineering and Object-Oriented Design in the Department of Applied Informatics at the University of Macedonia, Thessaloniki, Greece. From December 2017 he serves as Dean of the Faculty of Information Sciences and Head of the Department of Applied Informatics. He received the Diploma in Electrical Engineering and the Ph.D. degree in Computer Science from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, in 1996 and 2000, respectively. From 1997 to 1999 he was with Intracom S.A., Greece, as a telecommunications software designer. From 2007 to 2017 he was also a member of the teaching staff at the Hellenic Open University. His research interests include technical debt, software maintenance, software evolution analysis and empirical studies in software engineering. He is an Associate Editor for the Journal of Systems and Software and IET Software. He is a member of the Technical Chamber of Greece.


Odysseas Koufopavlou
5G Security

Dr. Odysseas Koufopavlou

Abstract

5G is the next generation of mobile communication systems. 5G networks support a massive number of connected devices, and offer significantly increase of bandwidth over LTE, and much improved capability of networking. These networks will transport large amount of IoT data.

Security is one of the most important value offerings of past 4 generations of wireless systems and will continue to be the key requirement for any new generation technology. The future of communications will drive new 5G security requirements, because of concerns for new use cases and new network architectures. We consider the security implications and cyber risk profile that come with 5G.

The most important 5G security enhancements are access agnostic primary authentication with home control, security key establishment and management, security for mobility, service based architecture security, inter-network security, privacy and security for services provided over 5G with secondary authentication. The above security evolutions and standardization status will be discussed.


Prof. Odysseas Koufopavlou, ECE Department, University of Patras

Prof. Odysseas Koufopavlou received the Diploma of Electrical Engineering in 1983 and the Ph.D. degree in Electrical Engineering in 1990, both from University of Patras, Greece. From 1990 to 1994 he was at the IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY, USA. He is currently Professor with the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Patras. He teaches undergraduate-postgraduate level courses on VLSI Systems and Computer Security and Architecture. He supervises Ph.D. students mainly in the areas of Computer and Communication Systems, VLSI Systems and Cryptography. His research interests include computer networks, high performance communication subsystems architecture and implementation, VLSI low power design, and VLSI crypto systems. From 2014 to 2018, he served as dean of school of engineering at University of Patras. He served as conference General Chair of the ICECS, SEAA, DSD and PATMOS conferences. He was member of organizing and technical program committees of many major conferences. He leads several projects funded by the European Commission, the Greek government, and major companies. He has also been a consultant for several companies. Dr. Koufopavlou has published more than 200 technical papers and received patents and inventions. He is a member of IEEE, the IFIP 10.5 WG, Euromicro Society and the Technical Chamber of Greece.

Yervant Zorian
Trends & Challenges in Today’s Automotive SOCs

Yervant Zorian

Abstract

Given today’s fast growing automotive semiconductor industry, this keynote will discuss its implications on automotive quality, reliability, functional safety and security in all aspects of the SOC lifecycle. The SOC lifecycle includes design, silicon bring-up, volume production, and particularly in-system reliability. Today’s automotive safety critical chips need multiple in-system robustness modes, such as key-on and key-off test and repair, periodic in-field self-test during mission mode, advanced error correction solutions, security authentication, and functional safety. The keynote will also discuss these in-system robustness modes and the show the benefits of meeting the ISO 26262 standard.


Yervant Zorian

Dr. Yervant Zorian is a Chief Architect and Fellow at Synopsys, as well as President of Synopsys Armenia. Formerly, he was Vice President and Chief Scientist of Virage Logic, Chief Technologist at LogicVision, and a Distinguished Member of Technical Staff AT&T Bell Laboratories. He is currently the President of IEEE Test Technology Technical Council (TTTC), the founder and chair of the IEEE 1500 Standardization Working Group, the Editor-in-Chief Emeritus of the IEEE Design and Test of Computers and an Adjunct Professor at University of British Columbia. He served on the Board of Governors of Computer Society and CEDA, was the Vice President of IEEE Computer Society, and the General Chair of the 50th Design Automation Conference (DAC) and several other symposia and workshops. Dr. Zorian holds 36 US patents, has authored four books, published over 350 refereed papers and received numerous best paper awards. A Fellow of the IEEE since 1999, Dr. Zorian was the 2005 recipient of the prestigious Industrial Pioneer Award for his contribution to BIST, and the 2006 recipient of the IEEE Hans Karlsson Award for diplomacy. He received the IEEE Distinguished Services Award for leading the TTTC, the IEEE Meritorious Award for outstanding contributions to EDA, and in 2014, the Republic of Armenia's National Medal of Science.

He received an MS degree in Computer Engineering from University of Southern California, a PhD in Electrical Engineering from McGill University, and an MBA from Wharton School of Business, University of Pennsylvania.


Rolf Drechsler (Presenter) and Christoph Lüth, University of Bremen/DFKI, Germany
Code is Ethics --- Formal Techniques for a Better World

Rolf Drechsler

Abstract

Computers are involved in our every-day life, making increasingly consequential decisions. This raises the question of the ethics of these decisions, for example when autonomous cars are concerned. We argue that the ethics of the decisions taken by a computer are in fact those of the developers, encoded in the program (``code is ethics''). This encoding is mostly implicit --- programmers and users are not aware of the implicit decisions that are being made before the program is even run. We suggest that formal methods are an excellent way to make the criteria under which these decisions are taken explicit, because formal specifications are more concise, abstract and clearer than code, This way, it becomes clear why systems act the way they do, and where the responsibility for their behaviour lies.


Rolf Drechsler

Rolf Drechsler (http://www.rolfdrechsler.de/) received the Diploma and Dr. phil. nat. degrees in computer science from the Johann Wolfgang Goethe University in Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt am Main, Germany, in 1992 and 1995, respectively. He worked at the Institute of Computer Science, Albert-Ludwigs University, Freiburg im Breisgau, Germany, from 1995 to 2000, and at the Corporate Technology Department, Siemens AG, Munich, Germany, from 2000 to 2001. Since October 2001, Rolf Drechsler is Full Professor and Head of the Group of Computer Architecture, Institute of Computer Science, at the University of Bremen, Germany. In 2011, he additionally became the Director of the Cyber-Physical Systems Group at the German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence (DFKI) in Bremen. His current research interests include the development and design of data structures and algorithms with a focus on circuit and system design. He is an IEEE Fellow. From 2008 to 2013 he was the Vice Rector for Research and Young Academics at the University of Bremen. Since 2018 he is the Dean of the Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science.

Rolf Drechsler was a member of Program Committees of numerous conferences including e.g., DAC, ICCAD, DATE, ASP-DAC, FDL, MEMOCODE, and FMCAD. He was Symposiums Chair at ISMVL 1999 and 2014, and the Topic Chair for "Formal Verification" at DATE 2004, DATE 2005, DAC 2010, and DAC 2011 and 2018. He received the Berninghausen Award for Excellence in Teaching in 2018. He is a co-founder of the Graduate School of Embedded Systems and he is the coordinator of the Graduate School "System Design" funded within the German Excellence Initiative. He received best paper awards at the Haifa Verification Conference (HVC) in 2006, the Forum on specification & Design Languages (FDL) in 2007 and 2010, the IEEE Symposium on Design and Diagnostics of Electronic Circuits and Systems (DDECS) in 2010 and the IEEE/ACM International Conference on Computer-Aided Design (ICCAD) in 2013 and 2018.

Rolf Drechsler is an Associate Editor of IEEE Transactions on Computer-Aided Design of Integrated Circuits and Systems, IEEE Transactions on Very Large Scale Integration Systems, IET Cyber-Physical Systems: Theory & Applications, International Journal on Multiple-Valued Logic and Soft Computing, and ACM Journal on Emerging Technologies in Computing Systems.


Prof. Dr. Muhammad Shafique, Vienna University of Technology (TU Wien), Vienna, Austria
Brain-Inspired Computing for Smart Cyber Physical Systems and Internet-of-Things: Challenges and Opportunities

Muhammad Shafique

Abstract

Gigantic rates of data production in the era of Big Data, Internet of Thing (IoT), and Smart Cyber Physical Systems (CPS) pose incessantly escalating demands for massive data processing, storage, and transmission while continuously interacting with the physical world under unpredictable, harsh, and energy-/power-constrained scenarios. Therefore, such systems need to support not only the high-performance capabilities at tight power/energy envelop, but also need to be intelligent/cognitive, self-learning, and robust. At the same time, every new generation of device technology faces new issues and challenges. Besides diverse reliability threats, a key issue is the sharp increase in power densities in on-chip systems according to the discontinuation of Dennard Scaling. These technological issues and the escalating challenges posed by the new generation of IoT and CPS systems force to rethink the computing foundations, architectures and the system software. As the process technology shrinks and the per-transistor performance/power efficiency is not keeping pace with the well-known power-reduction techniques (like Dynamic Voltage and Frequency Scaling, and Power Gating) at various abstraction layers, purely relying on the traditional low-power methods is most likely not sufficient to solve the rising energy-efficiency challenges.

At my CARE-Tech. group, we are investigating the foundations for the next-generation energy-efficient and robust computing systems while addressing the above-mentioned challenges across the hardware and software stacks. In this keynote, I will present our research roadmap and early results from the Brain-Inspired Computing (BrISC) project, ranging from approximate computing to neural processing with specialized machine learning hardware, covering fundamental and technological challenges, which enable new opportunities for improving the area, power/energy, and performance efficiency of systems by orders of magnitude. Towards the end, I will provide a quick overview of the security aspects of the machine learning systems deployed in Smart CPS and IoT.


Muhammad Shafique

Muhammad Shafique is a full professor (Univ.Prof.) of Computer Architecture and Robust Energy-Efficient Technologies (CARE-Tech.) at the Embedded Computing Systems Group, Institute of Computer Engineering, Faculty of Informatics, Vienna University of Technology (TU Wien) since Nov. 2016. He received his Ph.D. in Computer Science from Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Germany in Jan.2011. Afterwards, he established and led a highly recognized research group for several years as well as conducted impactful research and development activities in Pakistan. Besides co-founding a technology startup in Pakistan, he was also an initiator and team lead of an ICT R&D project. He has also established strong research ties with multiple universities in Pakistan, where he is actively co-supervising various R&D activities, resulting in top-quality research outcome and scientific publications. Before, he was with Streaming Networks Pvt. Ltd. (Islamabad office) where he was involved in research and development of video coding systems several years.

Dr. Shafique has demonstrated success in leading team-projects, meeting deadlines for demonstrations, motivating team members to peak performance levels, and completion of independent challenging tasks. His experience is corroborated by strong technical knowledge and an educational record (throughout Gold Medalist). He also possesses an in-depth understanding of various video coding standards (HEVC, H.264, MVC, MPEG-1/2/4). His research interests are in computer architecture, power- & energy-efficient systems, robust computing, dependable & fault-tolerant system design, hardware security, emerging Brain-Inspired Computing trends like Neuromorphic and Approximate Computing, Hardware and System-level Design for Machine Learning and AI, emerging technologies & nanosystems, FPGAs, MPSoCs, and embedded systems. His research has a special focus on cross-layer analysis, modeling, design, and optimization of computing and memory systems covering various layers of the hardware and software stacks. The researched technologies and tools are deployed in application use cases from Internet-of-Things (IoT), Cyber-Physical Systems (CPS), and ICT for Development (ICT4D) domains.

Dr. Shafique has given several Invited Talks, Tutorials, and Keynotes. He has also organized many special sessions at premier venues (like DAC, ICCAD, DATE, and ESWeek) and served as the Guest Editor for IEEE Design and Test Magazine (D&T) and IEEE Transactions on Sustainable Computing (T-SUSC). He is the TPC Chair of ISVLSI 2020. He has served as the TPC co-Chair of ESTIMedia and LPDC, General Chair of ESTIMedia, and Track Chair at DATE and FDL. He has served on the program committees of numerous prestigious IEEE/ACM conferences including ICCAD, ISCA, DATE, CASES, ASPDAC, and FPL. He is a senior member of the IEEE and IEEE Signal Processing Society (SPS), and a member of the ACM, SIGARCH, SIGDA, SIGBED, and HIPEAC. He holds one US patent and has (co-)authored 4 Books, 4 Book Chapters, and over 200 papers in premier journals and conferences.

Dr. Shafique received the prestigious 2015 ACM/SIGDA Outstanding New Faculty Award (typically, given world-wide to one person per year) for demonstrating an outstanding potential as a lead researcher and/or educator in the field of electronic design automation. Dr. Shafique also received six gold medals in his educational career, and several best paper awards and nominations at prestigious conferences like CODES+ISSS, DATE, DAC and ICCAD, Best Master Thesis Award, DAC'14 Designer Track Best Poster Award, IEEE Transactions of Computer "Feature Paper of the Month" Awards, and Best Lecturer Award.


Helena Holmström Olsson
Digitalization Disrupts: Software, Data and AI

Helena Holmström Olsson

Abstract

Digitalization is rapidly transforming not only software-intensive companies but all companies and society at large. Typically, digitalization is understood as using software and data to offer significantly improved products, pure software products as well as digital and data-driven services with the intent to create new revenue opportunities and replace traditional business models with new business models. However, despite the many opportunities, most companies fail in building new core capabilities and they struggle with transitioning towards new digital ways-of-working. This talk explores the opportunities and challenges associated with digitalization. It also provides guidance on how to avoid disruption and instead reap the benefits of a transformation that we have only seen the early beginnings of.


Helena Holmström Olsson

Bio: Helena Holmström Olsson is a Professor of Computer Science at Malmö University, Sweden. She got her PhD from University of Gothenburg in 2004. Her research is conducted in close collaboration with industry and as a senior researcher in Software Center (https://www.software-center.se/ ). Her research focuses on the digital transformation of industry and the many opportunities and challenges this brings. In particular, her research covers topics such as data-driven development, software and business ecosystems, autonomous systems and software engineering for AI. Her research has been published in top-level information systems and software engineering journals (https://scholar.google.se/citations?user=bjGw_5QAAAAJ&hl=en&oi=ao ). Helena can be contacted at helena.holmstrom.olsson@mau.se

Kostis Kaggelides
The Small Team and Tight Schedule Challenge. Pragmatic Innovations are Requested

Kostis Kaggelides

Abstract

The digitisation wave brings into play key issues for human capital, innovation management and of course software engineering. In the case of small teams and tight schedules (the undeniable case of modern-day information technology small to medium enterprises) all of the above are experienced in extreme conditions. Pitfalls and classic mistakes have been identified both in software engineering and project management, but a synthetic forward looking view is required. The talk will attempt to identify an innovation canvas for pragmatic solutions


Kostis Kaggelides

Mr. Kostis Kaggelides: is founder and Chief Operating Officer (COO) of Gnomon Informatics S.A. and is currently the president of the board for the association of IT companies of North Greece. He holds a M.Sc. in Knowledge Based Systems from the Artificial Intelligence Department, University of Edinburgh, UK, and a Electrical Engineering degree from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. Mr. Kaggelides presents 25 years’ experience in the development of information systems, services and products with responsibilities ranging from project implementation to project team set up and technology and strategy selection up to business planning and product management.